San Antonio’s vitality utility vows local weather motion, however continues to be plugged into gasoline


In accordance with data obtained by the watchdog Climate Investigations Center and shared with DeSmog, CPS Vitality pays over $50,000 in annual membership charges to the American Public Fuel Affiliation (APGA), and over $200,000 yearly in membership dues to the American Fuel Affiliation (AGA). Each groups lobby for continued dependence on methane gas, akin to direct use of gasoline in buildings for issues like heating and cooking, and oppose efforts to slash emissions by electrifying sectors like buildings and transportation. Their members and sponsors embrace giant vitality utilities and pipeline and fossil gas corporations like Duke Vitality, Enbridge, TransCanada, and BP.

As DeSmog beforehand reported on this “Unplugged” series, the California metropolis of Palo Alto can also be serving to to fund the American Public Fuel Affiliation through membership dues amounting to over $20,000 yearly and that are paid by town’s municipally owned utility. Some locally mentioned they see this funding as a battle with Palo Alto’s bold local weather objectives.

Equally, a number of environmental activists from the group in San Antonio instructed DeSmog that their municipal utility’s funding and assist for the methane gasoline foyer doesn’t appear to sq. with San Antonio’s aim, prescribed in a new city climate plan, to scale back town’s carbon emissions to web zero by 2050.

To have a aim of being carbon impartial by 2050, whereas on the identical time paying cash to a gasoline affiliation whose main aim is to maintain us hooked on fossil fuels, yeah, completely that’s a battle,” mentioned DeeDee Belmares, a San Antonio resident and local weather justice organizer with the nonprofit group Public Citizen.  […]

THREE OTHER ARTICLES WORTH READING

TOP COMMENTSRESCUED DIARIES

QUOTATION

“The president is a nationalist, which isn’t in any respect the identical factor as a patriot. A nationalist encourages us to be our worst, after which tells us that we’re the very best. A nationalist, ‘though endlessly brooding on energy, victory, defeat, revenge,’ wrote Orwell, tends to be ‘tired of what occurs in the true world.’ Nationalism is relativist, because the solely reality is the resentment we really feel once we ponder others. Because the novelist Danilo Kiš put it, nationalism ‘has no common values, aesthetic or moral.’ A patriot, in contrast, desires the nation to dwell as much as its beliefs, which suggests asking us to be our greatest selves. A patriot should be involved with the true world, which is the one place the place his nation may be beloved and sustained. A patriot has common values, requirements by which he judges his nation, at all times wishing it nicely—and wishing that it might do higher.”
          ~~Timothy Snyder, On Tyranny: Twenty Classes from the Twentieth Century (2017)


TWEET OF THE DAY

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BLAST FROM THE PAST

At Each day Kos on this date in 2003—Republicard: spend like there’s no tomorrow:

Introducing the Republicard. First practiced below the document deficit-spending of the Reagan-Bush administrations, and now re-issued below the fiscal wreckage of George Bush with a trifeca of Republican-rule to once more spend like theres no tomorrow. Miles, the creator of the cardboard:

Final week I used to be listening to a couple of proposal that had been launched into Congress to honor Ronald Reagan by placing him on the dime coin. Other than the truth that FDR, creator of the “March of Dimes”, definitely deserves to remain on that coin (and Nancy Reagan agrees)… it occurred to me that if somebody had been to honor George W. Bush, given his monumental deficits, essentially the most applicable place to take action could be… a bank card. So I imagined what it would appear to be, and got here up with the RepubliCard: (This concept concurrently occurred to political cartoonist Tom Toles who had a cartoon on this theme seem the very subsequent day).





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